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are not in a position to do things that we otherwise would be in a position to in terms of shaping the environment to prevent war. so in my view, americas 60 veto fiscal picture increases the risk of conflict around the globe media not always involving the u.s., though certainly the risk of increasing globally. based on our fiscal picture. the point that i would want to make is the budget deal requires us to deal with a full deck of cards and those people who keep wanting to take things off the table. when i say a full deck of cards, that includes defense participating in deficit reduction. this cannot be in the case of defense a sledgehammer approach. it's going to take a long line of dealing with these issues overtime to give the defense department time and they can make in my view very significant changes in the budget, but doing it in a way that does not damage our security. doing it abruptly as the fiscal cliff does or in a very compressed time frame is not only inefficient and dangerous to security in our s. my final point is that they are missing an element in this town is primarily politic
a pollution, dangerous to the environment in co2 is of course that these plans. they attempt to surprise or two epitomize the anti-nature, enterprise spirit of this administration. the reason we need another supply-side revival of the same kind we had under ronald reagan. >> would you change anything you wrote in the original "wealth and poverty"? >> i would've changed quite a lot. there's all kinds of details that a changed. but i found that to try to change one thing would be to change everything. so you know, you get into the morass of editorial work. so instead of changing an essentially retained the old look and added 40,000 new words at the beginning and kind and revision of my monetary policy in the middle. it's a new book, but it contains the old book veered >> pennysaver bishop monetary policy, what do you mean by that? >> i failed to make clear in the original version of "wealth and poverty" that i believe can stable currencies. i don't believe including current these. i agree with steve forbes that flow currencies, which is the standard value by which every entrepreneur has to
on the overall security environment on the peninsula as well as in asia. >> did you follow up anything new? we been hearing rumblings for a time. anything new you can provide in terms of insight into lunches are things like that? >> i think you're tracking it pretty well for the media today there are indications of what they will call a satellite launch. we believe it is still the u.n. security resolutions because of the missile they'll be fired and the implications it has for ballistic missiles activity somewhere down the road and the destabilizing impact it will have on the security environment throughout the region, not just dependent. >> can you follow up on some of that? what is your assessment? they say they saw birth of her problems at their failed launch. what is your assessment? how could they have felt the problems? juicier ran possibly helping them? and do you think he's doing this in response to hard-liners in his own government? why would he be doing this? >> well, the professed reason is to probably do it in conjunction with the anniversary on the 17th, which is widely reported i
environment and she been such a great champion of public transportation that even cal train named a loco motor after jackie spear. please welcome congress woman jackie spear. >> thank you mr. mayor. thank you secretary lahood. thank you to the incredible leadership, senator feinstein, nancy pelosi and mayor lee and the board of supervisors to chairman nol an from the sfmta. i am on pins and needles. do we have anything else to report? it's still at the same point we think they're in commercials. i am reminded from the song from "top gun" "take my breath away" and $942 million takes my breath away and i think to mayor lee for that amount i think we should get a leather flight jacket to thank mr. lahood for the great gift to our great city. the new money that is going to be used here is going to create 1,000 new jobs before the end of the year with many more jobs to come after that. that is something to applaud. thank you again secretary lahood for that. this is one point 7 miles very similar to the length of the golden gate bridge when 75 years ago that was going to be built and littl
and in the environment grow more numerous and more fearsome. in response, progressives of all stripes coalesce, find their voice and their strength and pioneer the development of a powerful set of new ideas and policy proposals confirming that the path to a better world does, indeed, exist. demonstrations and protests multiply, and a popular movement for pro-democracy reform and transformative change is born. at the local level, people in groups plant the seeds of change through a host of innovative initiatives that provide inspirational models of how things might work in a new political economy devoted to sustaining human and natural communities. and sensing the direction in which things are moving, our wiser and more responsible leaders rise to the occasion, support the growing movement for change and frame a compelling story or narrative that makes sense of it all and provides a positive vision of a better america. the movement broadens to become a major national force. we don't know exactly how these or other forces will emerge or interact, but we do know this: that pleas for immediate action, f
patronage. that environment created an atmosphere as well in which the islamic opposition could take greater root, and it was essentially, you know, became more and more -- there were a number of events which, because of our lack of understanding of what was going on in libya, would, in retrospect, signal, you know, to people who are watching this, that things were not going well in libya, that essentially, the people were getting increasingly frustrated with gadhafi and had the potential to be -- to explode. you have the -- another seminal event was a massacre in 1996 in which 1250 people were killed. this was by gadhafi's head under the supervision allegedly of gadhafi's head of internal intelligence. this was very important because the victims of that massacre were primarily political prisoners and from the eastern part of the country, and the east, you know, in a very tightly knit tribal society, an act of that mag magnitude basicy created cascading resentment which came to haunt gadhafi basically. this was -- that was a major event in creating reresentment in the regime. there was large
commitment, where we are today, in protecting the environment? >> well, it says that the protection of environment goes up and down in america. basically because of the attitude of the president. and when president reagan came in, he removed the solar panels and sent them to a college up in, i think, connecticut. now we have one of the solar panels at the carter center, the museum, and number one producer of solar panels in the world in china, also bought one of the solar panels. so they have brought a lot of money in for that small college. we need to have consistency in america and committing ourselves to preserving the environment, protecting us from global warming which is real and we need leadership coming from the white house every day saying we need to do something about global warming. that hasn't happened yet. my hope is in president obama's second term he'll be the leader of the world and not lagging behind the other nations in doing something about global warming. >> you're a nuclear engineer at one point, promoted nuclear energy. how do you make the distinction between n
what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumblings for some time that there might be some activity on that front. anything new that you can provide in terms of insights into launches or things like that? >> well, i think you're tracking a pretty well. i think from the media today there are indications declared indications of their intention to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. and we believe it is in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions, that because of the nature of the type of missile they will be firing and the implications it has for ballistic missile type of activity somewhere down the road, and the destabilizing impact that will have on security incitement throughout the throughout the region, not just on the peninsula. >> can you follow up on some of -- was short assessment? they say they have solve whatever problems they had with her april failed launch. what's your assessment? how could they have solve the problem? wh
. who have good home environments, right? who don't run a crazy ship at home. the kids with a crazy environment, homework hurts then. we have to make it equitable and fair for them to have the same environment to work on the crazy, familiarial problem. >> greg: what is french homework? riding a bicycle with a basket and bah quet? >> andrea: drinking red wine and smoking cigarettes. you got a-plus. >> bob: they go home and get loaded with wine. >> greg: i'm half french. bost you are? >> greg: yes. >> andrea: oh hl la. >> dana: que paso. >> greg: what does that mean? >> dana: what's up in spanish. >> greg: what does vit to do with this? you know who words from a language. >> dana: no. i know more than that. i do. i swear. feliz navidad. that is coming up, how much do they know about fe will beiz navdad? andrea hit the streets to find out. >> can you name tall santa reindeer? >> prancer. >> ♪ on this 12th day of christmas my true love gave to me 12 --" >> geese allaying. >> dana: christmas trivia directly ahead. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] you like who you are... and you learned somet
smiling, playing, and learning together in a safe environment. but here is the surprise. this isn't america, it's tijuana, mexico. a tough place for a child due to drugs, violence and poverty. but the first club is helping to change lives. and this is the first boys and girls club in south africa, lives are changed here and in mexico, because the children are learning that great futures start here. the expansion of the dream is due to the vision of tupperware brand's ceo, rick and his wife susan. for more than 20 years, he's been encouraging the company to make a difference through global and social responsibility. >> i think there's really a change in the role of what-- in the social contract between individuals and their governments. a lot of governments are going broke, there's a time here where corporations need to step up and find a way, not just to fund, but to put their focus, when you put funds and focus behind it, then things start to happen. >> tupperware is proof that some big businesses are big on helping others, since 1992, tupperware has been one of the leading corpo
me go into an environment and go doubling around and that, find out that i sort of like honey boo boo, that is a huge part of the american television experience and it gets sold short when you get techno is t-- ecstatic. a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escaping passivity and be able to roam around the tv jungle of finding things it did not know were there. >> michael powell on the future of television, monday night at 8:00 eastern on "the communicators." >> tomorrow, join us for reform and how education and innovation can benefit the u.s. economy. speakers include gene sperling, harvard university president, and former congresswoman and portugal vice-president, susan molinari. - google vice-president, susan molinari. from the american enterprise institute, join us live, 5:30 p.m. eastern also here on c- span. president obama troubles monday to an auto plant in michigan to merge congress to extend tax breaks for 998% of americans.
attractive to potential employers. >> it's about creating an environment where job providers and employers will want to come to michigan, create jobs here, better jobs, more jobs. >> we have hung out the open for business sign to the world. michigan has the best trained work force. now has options and opportunities for more people. >> ifill: republican governor rick snyder agrees the law will help the state. he has promised to sign it. snyder greeted president obama when he traveled to michigan today but there was no indication that they discussed the right-to-work issue. the president was later cheered when he visited an engine assembly plant outside detroit. >> these so-called right-to-work laws they don't have to do with economics. they have everything to do with politics. what they're really talking about is giving you the right to work for less money. >> ifill: 23 states have laws on the books banning the mandatory collection of union dues. in wisconsin republican governor scott walker turned aside a recall vote after he curtailed collective bargaining for public employees. voters lat
's volatile from a geopolitical standpoint. it's volatile from an environment, nature standpoint. >> rose: jeff immelt for the hour. next. >> rose: general electric is the nation's largest industrial company. it employs over 300,000 people around the world. it makes everything from aircraft engines to power plant turbines to medical imaging equipment. the company has evolved over the last decade over jeff immeant's watch. he has led a global expansion and shed once treasured businesses such as plastics and insurance. in 2011, president obama named him to lead the council on jobs and competitiveness. last month, the country created 146,000 jobs, exceeding expectations in the wake of hurricane sandy. further progress will be tested as the fiscal cliff deadline approaches without a deal inside yet. i'm very pleased to have jeff immelt back on this program. welcome >> charlie, thanks, good to be back with you. >> rose: we've talked many times about g.e. since you took over, i think once since -- just after 2001. where is the company today in terms of where do you want it to be and where do yo
environment, a huge life skill competitive sports in particular, extraordinary gain of american football. >> would you want for christmas? >> record by the dolphins but maybe we are off. we will see. i know i should aim higher. >> happy birthday. we are honored, we appreciate you being here. thank you for watching us. we are thankful for the partnership, thank you for coming out so early. thank you for a fantastic conversation. [applause] >> thank you for having me. >> the supreme court will look at what happened in 2008 by a majority of 6-3 and they are going to say that is a precedent and indiana had -- >> talking about facts, they decided on the indiana case it was constitutional for them to establish i d. they did not say that all of those states would subsequently -- [talking over each other] >> let me finish because you misrepresented what i said. [talking over each other] >> the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people, voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities because it -- somehow we have something missing in our brain.
is a matter of social justice. but if we can't have environments where students feel comfortable attending school, being comfortable with themselves and in themselves in a school environment we will never have students that are predicated in a way to be able to learn. we have to have safe schools. so what we did this year, when all of our administrators came back from summer break, every administrator from principals to the purchasing manager, everyone saw bully this year. and we spent a full year with our bifl department of student, family and community resources, we spent a full day debriefing that movie and going through a process where we talked about it and it was amazing to see grown adults having these realizations about what bullying meant to them and having a commitment from every administrator in our district that we will not allow that to happen this year and that will be one of the focus areas this year. so the ability to have these children now watch the movie as well was extremely moving to us yesterday. i just have to share one anecdote from that movie. we had a question
in our first panel, business creating a healthy safe and inclusive environment for all school students, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing eve
us about. host: thank you for the call. speaking along the lines of the environment and the epa. there is this -- from "to the boston globe" -- this from "the l.a. times" -- from "the gazette" in colorado -- our question for you is, what the think the president's no. 1 priority should be? just is joining us on the democrat line. caller: good morning. it was a little bit of serendipity that you read the editorial from "the new york times." i believe the first priority, our entire government should be repairing the infrastructure of the country. we have some infrastructure from the 19th century. with what just happened in new york, i really do think that our treasure and our people -- repairing the infrastructure will create jobs. we also have to begin protecting our coastal communities from the mega storms. even if we just decided right now to work against climate change or to slow down climate change, it still is going to happen. it will happen. it is a mechanism that is not going to stop even if we were to stop pumping co2 into the atmosphere. we have to prepare and work to tha
by the fact that we are a low interest-rate environment? >> we have not finished those calculations. we are in the midst of doing that for the budget. they are both large effects. we simply do not have an answer to that. >> it is a large effect that comes from the difference in interest rates. you know the low interest-rate environment customs? >> let me ask my team behind me to get that. we will have that for you in a moment. >> my guess is i am not sure that assumption is as low as the rate is today with an interest-rate of 1.6%, it is shockingly low. we have a fed insisting it will keep this way. i will be interested to see what the net effect of this interest rate is. >> there is an artificiality of the point in time because it presumes every one of the payoffs, we have no revenue to fha, where we know there is a large revenue -- >> there is a flaw in the model? >> no. congress requires the review is done in a runoff scenario. we also looked at, what if we keep doing business, so we have those projections. that is not the 2% calculation. it is something we could give you more detail
, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the am more at thisization of the principal and therefore this will be a more valuable change. second because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far larger. frankly, not many loans in the past have hit that limit. so even though it's $1 trillion portfolio, the value of that change is quite small for the old loans. it's really going to be quite valuable for these newer very low interest rate loans. >> i'll be briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that's a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes. here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores that lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis this country has faced since the de
and let me go into an environment and suddenly find i like honey boo boo and i'm watching its. i think that is a huge part of the experience and i think it is sold short. i still think a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escapism and being able to roam around the tv jungle finding things they did not know were there. >> ice -- i think people still love discovery. every month or every year, i hear some show people are suddenly talking about that i do not think you could have ever imagines choosing. if you said, i want you to choose "honey boo boo," or a certain food channel network, i do not think i have to predetermined that was my preference. the ability to stumble on them or to hear people talking about them and let me go into an environment and babble around in that and decide, i sort of like "honey boo boo," i think that is a huge part of the american television experience. i think it gets sold short. i think a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escaping and being able to roam around finding things they did not know was there. >> michael powell on the future of television.
cash. here in the low-interest rate environment, debt financing is going to be big. >> and the large cap plays. go through those. >> verifone, a leader in electronic payment devices. this has been disrupted by new players like square and paypal and google. the stock has been hit, but our fund manager we talked to think it's been unfairly hit. any time an industry is being disrupted, that's a good opportunity. >> u.s. bancorp? >> this is an old fashioned bank. focuses on deposits and loans and wealth management. none of the other stuff that can get you into trouble. this is one our clients really liked. >> this year dividend plays have been huge. everyone is looking for income. they look to these companies that have a good yield. the two that came through here were ford and, as it happens, our majority owner comcast. >> yes. so ford, you know, the auto recovery story is pretty significant. it's still happening. cars on the road are older. the replacement rate is going to go up. with ford, it has a rock-solid balance sheet. its dividend yield, we think, could go up. comcast is interest
state. >> a lot of places have drug-free work environments. now doesn't that come into question at least for today in washington state? is it the same as having a beer at lunch and coming to work? smoke a joint and come to work in what was a drug-free environment? >> it's a wonderful question. the effects will be different depending on one's tolerance. ultimately an employer has as right to expect when they employ people to come to work they are able and fit to do the job for which they were hired. certainly if there is as it relates to alcohol you're not sober and as it relates to marijuana you are a bit hazy of the mind, the employer would legally be well within their rights to take the appropriate action which means if you smoke too much, you're fired. >> guess that's a good answer to a clever conundrum they find themselves in. thank you so much. appreciate it. >>> coming up in ten minutes as well, the los angeles mayor is going to join me. he's going to talk about a federal crackdown on medical marijuana in california and now how all of this might square and he's also going to weigh
they are and will they be able to perform regardless of the macro environment? >> all right. we are focused on. companies that can grow regardless of what happens in the economy. three stocks we like, one is denbury resources. what's interesting about them is they have hedged their forward sales of oil so the lowest they're going to receive is $80 next year. at those rates, they're going to be a very profitable company. it's a very inexpensive stock. we like that. it's a u.s. oil producer as well. we like that. link linkedin, we think attracted as much attention as it should. they're executing very well in the professional business social networking sense. in particular, head hunters across the globe. this is now the method of head hunting. finally, an enterprise software design company used in making semiconductor chips. we see them as providing a very stable and growing play on technology without necessarily having to pick, you know, end winners. >> got it. >> thank you. >> very good, guys. thank you all for joining us today. rick, good luck with the reappraisal on your property there, whatever you're
to the golf game. that is the theory. that is no longer the case but in today's environment, now a consumer can access the bank on their terms. we have a credit union up in kingston, new york, open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. talk about customer convenience. >> he is eggsly -- especially recurring transfer and can't figure it out on the website. so nice to look at that person. does it work, say, for example, a tablet with a camera on it? can i use it from any device? >> that is our next phase in fact, liz. we'll take it to the tablet environment. we'll take it to the online environment. we have another product called the smart office. they have the ability to talk to an investment rep, mortgage rep. liz: can i deposit check by showing it to the teller? >> you can do that online anyway. you can do that through a mobile application out today. in our machine you actually scan it in and verifies the check as authentic. liz: disruptive technology it is known as. ugenius is the product. the founder and ceo, gene pranger. >> thank you. liz: david, he wasn't even a banker. david: you have to
the supervisors to put such an emphasis on improving the environment for us. thank you. >> thank you. i'm going to call up a couple more name cards. [ reading speakers' names ] >> good afternoon supervisors, thank you, my name is jorge potio, a lifetime resident of san francisco and i want to start by recognizing the hard work that has been put into the legislation. to those affects and to those who are supporting the people affected by this issue, really, it's serving as kind of a buffer to what could have been a real crisis. as a housing rights advocate for the mission collaborative for the past five years and a friend of many people who have had bed bugs i have wintered firsthand the devastating affects on lives. and so i can really appreciate this a[pro-rb/] and thank you to the working group that put this together. it puts in place procedures and policies that make it easier for housing advocates and tenant communitis to navigate this process, but we know we can put what we like on paper and promise to follow it to the best our abilitis and commit to the law whenever necessary, but un
we are decreasing our carbon emissions and achieve a sustainable environment. for instance this requires all new buildings designed to meet the gas reduction goals. that means more than 6 million square feet of commercial space and 11,000 housing units all in the development pipeline have been designed using these principles. [applause] in fact san francisco was recently recognized by the world green building council as having the greenest building policy by any local level in the year 2011 and we just began implementing our existing commercial energy performance ordinance which helps private property owners lower energy use. through san francisco's program green sf we are making it easier for property owners to secure financing for green building upgrades and as can you see green buildings has become the standard rather than the exception. for our public libraries to affordable housing units, even to the home of our world series giants and their structure our buildings are achieving lead certification at a rapid pace and our san francisco public utilities commission has
and be curious in a hands-on environment just like real scientists. with over 100 interactive encounters to choose from, a few of my son's favorites include the clubhouse build in the trees and human fossils and the simulating river that seems to be swimming when they step on it. >> naturequest is this amazingly fun world that's scientifically lis tick. you can explore from the oceans and top of the mountains and everywhere you look there's something to do, something to find. >> what does a 2-year-old care about science? >> not much, but my son has so much fun exploring he doesn't lielz his little brain is working too. ann clair stapleton, cnn, atlanta. [ male announcer ] when it comes to the financial obstacles military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to
on a new, we have the un at trading on the environment. this makes no difference -- >> why not throw a bone to bob dole? >> why throw a bone to the un? >> oh. >> is run byy dictatotors, it has a human rights committee with the worst violators in the world. why should we give any legitimacy at all? give me an answer on that. >> the chamber of commerce supports the street, along with the veterans' organizations and religis groups. they suprt it because the united states has been the leader in this area and they would like other countries to comply, make -- >> it is modeled on the americans with disabilities act. >> i know that, but it has no effect -- >> the point of the treaty is get other countries to become signatories and i got to the language and the intent of the treaty, to look out for people with disabilities. you accept the arguments. >> yeah, exactly the way the u.n. human r rights commission has spread human rights to countries around the world. it does nothing. >> you used to call people who thought like this nativist. >> it s notng to do with it nativism. the u.n. is a perniciou
have environments that are built where kids feel like they're connected to the school. that's why you always hear me talk about do our kids really feel like someone at the school knows them and understands them and they can go to the person if they have a problem with anything. some schools are doing extremely well. some schools are building the system now. >> he is also engaging students through social media and they could submit questions through twitter as well as facebook. >>> making national headlines today. members of the team gathered to say farewell. players coaches and staff joined belcher's family and friends at a memorial service yesterday. belcher killed himself in a murder/suicide last week. he killed his girlfriend perkins at their home saturday morning and then shot himself in front of chiefs' coaches and management at the stadium. belcher and perkins leave behind a 3-month-old daughter. >>> the aurora, colorado movie theater where the gunman opened fire earlier this year getting ready to reopen. the city's mayor says it will open to the public on january 18th. before
by the american people and your businesses and the economic environment worldwide. we should not accept going through that. you know, john engler, he and i philosophically do not agree on much -- [ laughter ] >> you know, i am just being honest about john. he ii a great politician. he comes from the other party. he is exactly right when he says the only thing that the debt ceiling is good for is destroying your credit rating. i want to send a very clear message to people here. we are not going to play that game next year. if congress in any way suggest that they will type negotiations to that feeling both and take us to the brink of default onne again, as part of a budget to go she asian, which, by the way, we have never done in our history, until we did it last year, i will not play that game. with that, let me just say, we have one path where we resolve this fairly quickly. we have some tough spending cuts. we have modest revenue increases. you get business certainty. you do what you do best. and, we then have an open running world next year to deal with a whole host of other issues like in
and their negotiating from their ipad, mobile phone or home computer. and women are very comfortable in that environment. and really like the fact that they are now in control of the negotiation rather than the old scheme where they have to come into the dealership and jump through the hoops. >> i'm very optimistic that a transformation is underway. much more customer friendly. >> good to talk with you, thanks so much. >> i'll see you soon. up next, the woman behind the king. tony winning lion king director julily taymor. >> you've seen it how many times? i've seen it hundreds. if you think running a restaurant is hard, try running four. fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. if we wantour schools... ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing
've had those things happen, do they have a productive environment to solve problems? not necessarily. they're still overcoming the divisiveness, the hard feelings from all of that." at the time reporters wanted to know whether rick snyder would support what is known as a right to work law. the idea of right to work is simple. under a right to work law, employees of a union shop don't have to pay union dues. the employees get the benefit of the union, the higher wages and better health care, all of that, but they do not have to pay for it. why pay money if you can have something for free? for unions, the results of this are close to catastrophic which is why republicans and big business love right to work laws. they are a way of destroying unions. the same heritage foundation that will be jim demint's new home says union membership fell by 15% in states that passed right to work. union organizing fell by half, passing a right to work law stops unions and it stops organizing. on the labor left, the economic policy institute reports that wages fall by more than 3% after you institute ri
will say however that the value of doing it now in a low-interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principle and therefore this will be a more valuable thing in second, because the phones are so low interest rate, they will be on our books for a larger -- so frankly loans in the past and hit that limit so even though it's a trillion dollar portfolio, the value is actually small for the old loans and it will be quite valuable for these new worth largest rate loans. >> mr. chairman if i could have time briefly for more questions. i see that fha is now making loans to people that three years ago we were foreclosing on. and that is a very different standard than what exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes and here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores and lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis this country has faced
and using that as an opportunity to say if this environment, that is not to make things rougher for workers by hiking taxes on the well-to-do. i am over simplifying this, chris van hollen is joining me from the house of representatives, a prominent democrat. >>guest: what we are talking about here in washington, is trying to extend middle class tax cuts, to ask high income individuals to pay a little bit more to reduce our deficit because if they don't pay anymore, it means that seniors on medicare are going do have to pay a lot more and they will have lets to invest in our infrastructure and roads. it is a fight for the middle class. unions form to bargain for better wages and working conditions for workers that is why they are there. this law they are about to pass in michigan, undermines their ability to do that. >>neil: how if it gives workers a chance to say you want to be in a union or not? >>guest: it creates a free rider problem and republicans in most cases don't like free riders. i don't think anyone should. what it says is, the unions --. >>neil: but democrats don't feel --. >>gu
what the environment means in haiti. >> the environment means a lot. haiti is a country that has been hit by seasonal climate events almost every year. weather events and hurricanes have severely affected the country. every year, thousands of people are dying. many have been displaced. many others are still homeless. as a youth, it is my responsibility to take part in these activities, to do something about it. i would like to see climate justice. >> what the climate justice mean to you? >> for me, eradication of poverty. that means developed countries need to take responsibility by fulfilling -- by providing finance, which is key for countries like haiti. >> marco, what the climate justice mean to you? >> all of that, including the fact that currently, emissions in the atmosphere, 75% are coming from developed countries , countries that have done everything for over a century and now they're trying to place the burden on developed countries -- developing countries who barely have enough to eat. we have a severe injustice here that we need to act on. climate justice, in a nutshell, me
of hearing about frankly. the overburdensome regulatory environment that we're in is depressing growth, particularly for small business. and i think that's a primary distinction here as we talk about business itself because all business is not created equal. and the president's jobs council who has some wonderful folks, some friends of mind on it, wholly inefficient in my view because there is no representation from small business on that jobs council. melissa: catherine, let me ask you, what i look what happened with the case in darden, it seems like what happened to a bunch of different companies, my take at the end of the day, for sure they're not going to hire anyone and that's what we need more than anything right now. >> you're exactly right. what we need are jobs, jobs, jobs. there is so much uncertainty out there right now with what will happen with taxes. we still don't know the full impacts of obamacare. hundreds of thousands of new regulations. we need to know what is going on to make good decisions and grow our businesses because of that. melissa: jamie, do you think to a c
of their people here, in this environment, there is little reason to lock at promising u.s., what is attracting money to places like switzerland, that it is not, inhibiting capital forming a and grrwth, we are. this has been developinn under republicans and democratic presidents alike with rules and regulations this is a very unfriendly environment to business. >> tax -- real tax rate for the large corporations, many who pay no federal income tax is 17%, it is not 35% or 30%, that is the tax rate, due to all loopholes. neil: i know, we can get into this argument. the real tax rate in japan now north of 13%, we can go back and forth on this but trend is up here, there are a lot of countries where reversing or slowing there, that is to a businessman looking to expand a good reason to expand. >> let's lower the bar, let's expect these u.s. corporationss3 with their privilages they have been given, as least keep as much money her as percentage -- >> you act like they are doing nothing here. they are hiring people, and growing hire, they have done a well the here, and our thank you to them. >> as we
donald payne to require firsthand knowledge of how the workplace works and the environment in which those miners go to work every day. in the classroom, lynn woolsey continues to fight for women and working families. she was -- i want to say harsh, but i will say tough advocate. making sure that women were represented in the stem fields and the careers and women and young women had access to the sciences and to technology and to math and engineering. lynn woolsey worked to ensure kids had access at every education -- every education opportunity and a well-rounded curriculum to meet their social and emotional needs. american families have benefited from lynn woolsey's fierced a vow casey. harsh, spirited. that's our advocate, lynn. i will miss here contributions on the education committee for the years to come. she's fought tirelessly to protect the environment. most especially in the sonoma coast of san francisco bay and hopefully the president will follow her lead and designate further protections of our ocean and marine habitat in that area of our precious coast. i am very grateful for
to implement. i will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal and therefore this will be a more valuable change. second because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far larger. frankly, not many loans in the past have hit that limit. so even though it's $1 trillion portfolio, the value of that change is quite small for the old loans. it's really going to be quite valuable for these newer very low interest rate loans. >> i'll be briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that's a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes. here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores that lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis th
will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal. therefore, this will be a more valuable change. second, because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far longer. not many loans in the past have hit that limit. even though it is $1 trillion, the value of the change is small for the old loans. it is going to be valuable for these newer, very low interest rate loans. >> briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that is a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. why are you doing that? put this is another area where we are working on changes. responsible hone owners got good credit scores that lost their jobs. we believe somebody can show that they are back to work and a responsible borer again. that is someone we would work with. i would agree that our standards are not clear enough in dividing those. so what we
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